The Knotting Dictionary of Kännet
   
   Start page

Knots:
Reefknot
Fisherman's Knot
Water Knot
Sheetbend
Lark's head
Round Turn
Timber Hitch
Fisherman's loop
Bowline
Prussick
Clove Hitch
Sheepshank
Jug Sling Hitch
Whipping
Round hitch
Slippery round hitch
Pile Hitch
Two Half Hitches
Buntline Hitch
Monkey's fist
Diamond knot
Simple Simon Over
Double Simon
Simple Simon Under
Vice Versa


About Jan Korpegård
facebook

Vice versa

Vice versa
Vice versa is also a variant of sheet bend and square knot.
This knot is invented by Dr Harry Asher, and is introduced in the book "The Alternative Knot Book", ISBN 0 7136 5950 5.
Post on facebook

Other Languages (Show)

Reccomended Books
At amazon.com (USA):
The Ashley Book of Knots
The Marlinspike Sailor
Knot Tying: Advanced Knotting (CDROM)

User Comments (Hide)
Everything in this box is submitted by other users on Internet. I take no responsibility of the information.

Submitted by: Peter C. Broek
I want to make eight fenders. These plastic one's don't fit with the age of the ship. Can you show me how?

Thanks.

Peter

Submitted by: Bob Graves
This is a particularly good knot for very slipery materials - even wet leather. Just snug it up well prior to subjecting it to a strain.

Submitted by: Robert Graves
Thanks for this one. It is especially useful for very slippery materials, single strand synthetics, wetleather, etc.

Submitted by: Dan Lehman
This knot structure was published long before Asher took to thinking that the asymmetric loading of it was a neat idea: it came out of an old review of then-current climbing knots ca. 1928? in the Alpine Journal (cf. History & Science of Knots--a pricey, but GOOD book on knots (one of f e w , alas!)). That knot is loaded symmetricly as follows: load what you show as the end at left and the Spart at right (i.e., of the center 4 parts of rope--horizontal center--, the ones at top & bottom are SParts, the interior ones the ends).
Cheers,
--dl*
====

Submitted by: RAY DESARO
I WAS PLEASED TO FIND A SITE WITH A GRAND SELECTION OF KNOTS . . . I DID NOT SEE HOWEVER THE TOUGHT LINE HITCH THAT IS MOST USED IN TRIMMING A TENT LINE. . . PLEASE ADD IT TO YOUR DICTIONARY. RESPECTIVELY. . .

Submitted by: LILLAIN MCGONN A SANK GAL
I GO WITH RAY BUT THEY ARE QUITE HARD TO DO AND I WAS UPSET ABOUT NOT FINDING THE DEVILS SNARE AND THE DEVILS TOUNGE BUT I'M SURE ALBUS WON'T MIND AT ALL

Submitted by:
Ray,

Same as the two half hitches except on the first hitch, pass through the loop once more then finish with the 2nd hitch.

or, Find a second class Boy Scout to do it.

Submitted by: Sharon Klein
Excellent page! I do have a question though.
I'm doing my grandson's bedroom in a nautical theme. I want to put posts (several) at the top & end of his bed. The type that you see by the ocean marinas where the posts are tied together and the posts are actually in different lengths or heights (depending upon how you look at it.
Do you know how to achieve this look??

Submitted by: Jim Gebhardt
You should remove Dr. Harry Asher as the inventor of this knot. I invented it! He has done a wonderful job of promoting it - and himself!

Submitted by: Jim Gebhardt
Some people can't handle the truth!

Submitted by: Glenn Orebaugh
I am hoping you can help me find a lacing.whipping or covering knot ? . I want to cover a wheel on a sailboat. But I do not know what it is called. The knot goes arould the wheel completely with sengle line over the top of the covering line. If you know how I can find out how to do this please let me know Thanks

Submitted by: TreeSpyder
The way this sample is laced, the Standing Part of the line is brought to the Standing Part of the other line. This mimics the weakness in a Left Handed SheetBend that a Square Knot is forced to have.

i think a Square Knot must trace a 1 Standing Part to the other Standing Part to match the pulls from each leg of line. This is less stable than the strongest pull of the Standing Part clamping down on the other line's Working End, after force has been reduced by the choke of a SheetBend etc.

i believe that a Square is unique in that it is so simple, it can't place maximum pull against something that will hold (Working End in most lacings) as the force to it is so reduced. Even a Slippery Hitch/ Slippery Round Hitch can do that. The turns around the spar reduce the pull on the line at that point thru friction. Then the reduced pull is placed under the main pull to secure.

So the best a Square Knot can do is match the pulls, for placing a Standing Part/ mainline pull on it's mate's Working End, pulls it right out (Thief Knot).

This Vice Versa lacing has the choking hitch that the Square does not, and so i think should trace to the main line pull/ Standing Part of 1 line to the other line's Working End for most security like a SheetBend.

Submitted by: Warren Cameron
I too, think this site is missing the tought line hitch. As an Arborist in Canada I have found it among one of my most used knots, amongst the bowline, figure eight and the clove hitch. As for invention, I don't care who did it, I am just so glad that someone thought ALL knots out. It is said the wheel was the greatest invention. However, with out the knot we would never have progressed to the wheel.

Submitted by: Warren Cameron
Sorry! I forgot to say thank you for having the site in the first place. I thank you!

Submitted by: Dan Lehman
The image is different from what I commented on initially (or
at least from what the CORRECT image of Vice Versa is! )-:
Vice Versa is an Asymmetric loading of a symmetric structure.

1) The image given is incorrect to show the knot loaded on both
parts that run to the center of the knot: rather, only ONE
such end is loaded, and the opposing rope is loaded on the
end running at the side of the knot
(in contrast, the Reever Bend, presented in a 1928 issue of the Alpine Club's
journal, is loaded on both ends that run along the outside).

2) One can imagine how Asher came to devise this knot, considering the
alterations he found for the Bowline: take a common Sheet Bend (where ends are on the same side, as opposed
to what is sometimes called--by Ashley, e.g.--a "Lefthanded" s.b.)
and give the U-part a twist/cross en route to it's apex;
then bring the other rope's end out through this twisted loop.

--dl*
====

Submitted by: Dan Lehman
[could be appended to earlier comment today]

Another way to say how the correct image should appear:
the ends should both lie either above or below the loaded
parts.

Also, Harry Asher presente the knot first, I think, in the Int.Guild of
Knot Tyers [sic] newsletter Knotting Matters; he published it
first in his booklet published by the IGKT entitled _A New System
of Knotting_ Vol.1 [1986].

--dl*

Submitted by: Dan Lehman
THE PICTURED KNOT IS ***NOT*** VICE VERSA!

Vice Versa is ASYMMETRICALLY loaded; that is, what is the end
on one side, is the loaded part ("SPart") on the opposite side/rope.
You show a symmetric knot, which could be called the
Reverse Reever Bend (as it reversed the ends/SParts of that
knot).
You need to change ONE of the rope's end/SPart in order to make
this a Vice Versa bend. Or, to put it another way, the ends should
BOTH lie on the top (or else on the bottom) of the knot, not one atop, the other below.

2006-11-28


Add more info on this knot!
Please submit only information that could be useful for others about this knot. Feedback and questions should be directed to jan@korpegard.nu and for common opinion you should use the guestbook.

If you find anything on this page that you think should be removed, please send a mail to jan@korpegard.nu and tell me which knot and which text that should be modified.
Your Name:

More information about Vice versa:

  
©1994-2007 Korpegard.se


In Association with Amazon.com